CT Scan

Optimized-IMG_7024

The computed tomography (CT) scan is a medical imaging procedure Machine that uses x-rays and digital computer technology to create cross-section images of the body. It can make an image of every type of body structure at once, including bone, blood vessels and soft tissues, it may also be used to make sure a procedure is done correctly. For example, the doctor may use CT to guide a needle during a tissue biopsy or to guide the proper placement of a needle to drain an abscess. For people with cancer, a CT scan can help determine how much the cancer has spread. This is called staging the cancer.

During the CT scan procedural test, you will lie on a table that is attached to the CT scanner, which is a large doughnut-shaped machine. The CT scanner sends X-rays through the body area being studied. Each rotation of the scanner provides a picture of a thin slice of the organ or area. All of the pictures are saved as a group on a computer. They also can be printed.

Why it is done

CT scans are used to study areas of the body and the arms or legs and below are some of the CT scan procedures that can be carried.

Chest (thorax). A CT scan of the chest can look for problems with the lungs, heart, esophagus, the major blood vessel (aorta), or the tissues in the center of the chest. Some common chest problems a CT scan may find include infection, lung cancer, a pulmonary embolism, and an aneurysm. It also can be used to see if cancer has spread into the chest from another area of the body.
Abdomen. A CT scan of the abdomen can find cysts, abscesses, infection, tumors, an aneurysm, enlarged lymph nodes, foreign objects, bleeding in the belly, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and appendicitis.

Urinary tract. A CT scan of the kidneys, urethras, and bladder is called a CT KUB or CT urogram. This type of scan can find kidney stones, bladder stones, or blockage of the urinary tract.